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Tickets

Evening lecture - 'From Lincolnshire to Luxor: Harry Burton, the Camera, and King Tut'

Evening lecture - 'From Lincolnshire to Luxor: Harry Burton, the Camera, and King Tut'

How did Harry Burton, born in Stamford in 1879, come to photograph the most famous archaeological find of the 20th century – the tomb of Tutankhamun? In this lecture, Egyptologist Christina Riggs presents new research on Burton’s life and career. Photography changed both how archaeologists worked and how the public viewed archaeology. Burton’s camera may have captured ‘King Tut’, but it also captured our imagination of Egypt, ancient and modern alike.

The lecture will be held in The Collection's auditorium. The museum and the Photographing Tutankhamun exhibition will be open from 6pm and there will be a paying bar in the Orientation Hall. Dr Riggs' lecture will begin at 7pm and the event will close at 9pm.

Lecture ticket   £8.00

Lunchtime Lecture - Revealing the Roman Dead: recent excavations and research in Lincoln

Lunchtime Lecture - Revealing the Roman Dead: recent excavations and research in Lincoln

Join Natasha Powers of Allen Archaeology for an archaeological lunchtime lecture

Excavations in Lincoln in recent years have seen a number of new Roman burials uncovered, adding to our understanding of the location and extent of the cemeteries located outside of the Roman city. Analysis of the skeletons themselves is revealing new insights into burial practices, including the burials of newborns and incidents of unusual ('deviant') rites such as decapitation. In this talk Natasha Powers will explore some of these new discoveries and place them within the context of our existing knowledge about death and burial in Roman Britain.

Natasha Powers is a Senior Manager at Allen Archaeology and an experienced field archaeologist and osteologist.

This talk is part of our ongoing Lunchtime Lectures series. It will be held in the auditorium at The Collection, starting at 12.30 and lasting for approximately 30 minutes.

Lunchtime Lecture ticket   £3.00

Lunchtime Lecture - Sex, Symbol and Supernatural: Roman Phallic Carvings in Lincolnshire

Lunchtime Lecture - Sex, Symbol and Supernatural: Roman Phallic Carvings in Lincolnshire

Join Adam Parker of The Open University for an archaeological lunchtime lecture.

Roman phallic imagery has been intriguing people for centuries, variously viewed as being either obscene or comical; placed proudly on public display or locked away in special rooms for the eyes of certain visitors only. Tour guides at Pompeii famously, and erroneously, tell tourists that phallic imagery on buildings and pavements points the way to brothels. In this lecture, Adam Parker will explore the phenomenon of Roman phallic imagery in Britain using examples from Lincolnshire, placing it into the wider context of Roman ritual and superstition.

Adam Parker is Assistant Curator of Archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum and currently studying for his PhD with the Open University, investigating Magic in Roman Britain.

This talk is part of our ongoing Lunchtime Lectures series. It will be held in the auditorium at The Collection, starting at 12.30 and lasting for approximately 30 minutes.

Lunchtime Lecture ticket   £3.00

Lunchtime Lecture - Early Middle Palaeolithic Occupation of the Channel Plain Region

Lunchtime Lecture - Early Middle Palaeolithic Occupation of the Channel Plain Region

Join Sam Griffiths of the University of Southampton for an archaeological lunchtime lecture.

The English Channel Region (or 'La Manche') has long been of interest to Palaeolithic Research and Quaternary studies. However the key Neanderthal site of La Cotte de St. Brelade, originally excavated between 1962-78, has never fully been re-evaluated within a modern research context. In this talk, Sam Griffiths will discuss some of the new knowledge, its importance to understanding Neanderthal occupations of the region, and what it can tell us of the further North-Western European region, with examples from Lincolnshire and the East Midlands.

Sam Griffiths is a PhD student at the University of Southampton.

This talk is part of our ongoing Lunchtime Lectures series. It will be held in the auditorium at The Collection, starting at 12.30 and lasting for approximately 30 minutes.

Lunchtime Lecture ticket   £3.00

Lunchtime Lecture - Respecting Death: Pre-Christian votive practices

Lunchtime Lecture - Respecting Death: Pre-Christian votive practices

This lecture will look at the way museums display pre-Roman artefacts associated with death and religious practices. It will examine the way such votive objects are curated and explores whether this can have an effect on the way visitors identify with the past.

Kevin Manvell works at The Collection and has recently completed an MA in Community Archaeology at Bishop Grosseteste University.

This talk is part of our ongoing Lunchtime Lectures series. It will be held in the auditorium at The Collection, starting at 12.30 and last for approximately 30 minutes.

Lunchtime Lecture ticket   £3.00

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